In both men and women, decreased libido is linked to aging and hormonal changes. While women often suffer from decreased libido after menopause, men may have a similar experience while undergoing andropause, a condition sometimes called male menopause.

In both sexes, decreased libido is usually just one symptom relating to lower hormone levels, although it is a symptom that may have upsetting effects not only for the person but also on their spouse or partner. A decreased libido treatment doctor in Connecticut may be able to revive your sex drive with appropriate hormonal therapy.

Decreased Libido in Male Patients vs. Women Patients

Male testosterone levels peak in their 20s and begin dropping in their 30s, but most men do not notice a loss of libido until the time they reach their 50s. While lower testosterone levels are a prime cause of decreased libido in men, other factors may also prove responsible. These include significant weight gain or alcohol and drug use.

Females with decreased libido may not only have little or no desire for actual sexual intercourse but also may have no interest in masturbation and few, if any, sexual fantasies. Hormonal changes may also result in vaginal dryness and/or pain during intercourse. Women may not have much sexual interest when they are pregnant or shortly after childbirth, but their desires should return to normal within a few months of giving birth.

Common Reasons for a Decreased Libido

Not every case of decreased libido is strictly the result of hormonal changes. Certain diseases and medications can affect sex drive. Antidepressants are a major culprit. While these drugs may improve mood, they dampen desire. Certain high blood pressure medications may lower libido, especially in males.

In some women, birth control pills result in a chilling effect on libido. Men and women taking opioids for pain control may also find themselves with no sexual desire, along with the risk of becoming addicted to these drugs.

Can Medical Diseases or Illness Cause Decreased Sex Drive?

Thyroid issues in either gender may wreak libido havoc, as does depression and other psychological problems. Diabetes, high cholesterol, and cancer treatments all may influence desire. There is also bad news for balding men longing for hair as certain hair growth drugs can have a negative effect on libido.

A Connecticut doctor can take a complete medical history, which may identify a prior or current illness affecting libido. When meeting with them, it is important to provide the doctor with all information regarding current medication, whether prescription or over-the-counter, as well as any supplements taken.

Hormone Replacement Therapy

Connecticut hormone therapy can reverse the decreased libido dilemma and restore a normal sex drive. For women, the use of bioidentical hormone replacement therapy derived from yam or soy not only improves desire but can eradicate vaginal dryness and have a positive effect on the skin, as well as on sleep and energy levels.

These hormones, which are the same on the molecular level as those produced by the body, are not the off-the-shelf equine estrogens made from pregnant mare’s urine that have been linked to breast cancer and heart attacks.

For men, testosterone replacement therapy not only improves libido and erectile function, but can also aid with sleep, mood, and cognitive problems. Men and women are carefully monitored to ensure they are receiving the correct amount of hormone for their needs. A custom-tailored diet and exercise plan also helps each patient reach optimal health.

How Doctor Can Help

If your libido is not what it used to be your self-esteem and intimate relationships may feel strained. However, you do not have to live with these facts. Hormone replacement therapy can help restore your sex drive. If your libido is not what it once was and you want that to change, call the offices of Dr. Edward Jacobson today and arrange an appointment. As a doctor working with people to overcome decreased libido he may be able to help you feel like your old self again.