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A study published in August 2018 titled “Low Dose Naltrexone: A Novel Approach in Treating Neuroinflammatory and other Chronic Degenerative Conditions” details the relief to various pain symptoms that LDN can offer, despite the fact that LDN also blocks the body’s opioid receptors. Chronic pain is just one of the growing list of conditions that respond to LDN therapy.

In low doses, this medication helps normalize the immune system as well. If joint pain or fatigue limits your life, a Connecticut wellness doctor can help improve your circumstances with the help of LDN therapy.

Low-Dose Naltrexone

The FDA approved naltrexone, an opiate antagonist, in 1984 for doses of 50 mg to treat heroin addicts. Naltrexone combated heroin’s effect by blocking the body’s opioid receptors. The following year, Dr. Bernard Bihari found that a low dose of the drug could help HIV patients battle some of their symptoms too.

Later, Dr. Bihari also found that patients with lupus and cancer benefited from LDN, as it increases the body’s endorphin levels and promotes a sense of well-being. Other researchers found that many types of chronic pain result from autoimmune disorders, which can be helped by LDN’s suppression of inflammation in immune cells located in the spinal cord and brain, also known as microglia.

LDN Treatment

While LDN can also help relieve joint pain and fatigue, the results of this therapy are not immediate. Fortunately, most patients report a positive therapeutic response between three and six months after starting LDN treatment.

Additionally, studies show that LDN is most effective when used in combination with an autoimmune diet, which is gluten and dairy-free and focuses on fresh and fermented vegetables as well as “low to modest amounts” of quality protein. Other conditions that may be treated with LDN include:

  • Anxiety
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Depression
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Headaches

Side Effects and Eligibility

LDN is generally safe for patients to use, but there are potential side effects like with any drug, including:

  • Dry mouth
  • Insomnia
  • Temporary nausea
  • Vivid dreams

Side effects typically cease when the dosage is changed or taken at a different time of day. Patients should consult with a Connecticut physician to learn whether it is safe and beneficial for them to undergo LDN therapy.

LDN is best taken with food, and patients should start with a small dose and gradually raise the dosage to an appropriate amount.  At high doses, naltrexone may cause kidney or liver damage, so those with impaired kidney or liver function should be carefully monitored while taking LDN.

People taking opioids for pain relief should not use LDN, nor should patients taking anti-rejection immune suppressants. Additionally, anyone who has undergone an organ transplant is not eligible for LDN therapy.

Patients scheduled for surgery or any procedure requiring pain medication should stop taking LDN beforehand and discuss the clearance period with a Connecticut doctor. Furthermore, they should not resume taking LDN until they are no longer using pain medication.

Call an Experienced Connecticut Physician to Learn More About Low-Dose Naltrexone

If you or a loved one suffer from chronic pain, fatigue, and other conditions responsive to LDN therapy, call our Connecticut office today or contact us online to arrange an appointment. In addition to LDN therapy, we offer various hormonal treatments and therapies that could help address fatigue, pain, fibromyalgia, and other issues severely affecting your quality of life.